The Crown Heist (The Cromwell Chronicles Book 1)

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Contents

  1. Economic Manuscripts: Capital Vol. I - Chapter Twenty-Seven
  2. Independent news email
  3. Economic Manuscripts: Capital Vol. I - Chapter Twenty-Seven
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With his new status, the King ordered new regalia to be made, which included the The diamond's history dates back to the s and for the most part has been uneventful.

Economic Manuscripts: Capital Vol. I - Chapter Twenty-Seven

The gem was offered with other Bavarian Crown Jewels in a auction at Christie's in London, but apparently it did not sell, nor did it return to its display in Munich. Rumours included one that the stone had been sold illegally in through a Munich jeweller and had reappeared in the Netherlands. Later research indicated that the gem had actually been sold in Belgium in and that it had changed hands again in In millions of visitors came to Brussels for the World Exhibition, which included the jewellery display which included a large blue diamond.

But no one was aware it was the missing Wittelsbach Diamond.

In January Joseph Komkommer, a leading figure in the Belgian diamond industry, received a phone call asking him to look at an Old Mine cut diamond with a view of its recutting. When he opened the package he found a dark blue diamond, which is among the rarest and most valuable of gems. Komkommer at once recognized that the diamond was one of historical significance and that it would be a tragedy to recut it. With the assistance of his son, Jacques Komkommer, he identified the diamond as the 'lost' blue diamond.

The vendors were the trustees of an estate whose identity remained undisclosed. Finally, the Wittelsbach was acquired by private collector in It was announced in October the diamond would be offered for auction at Christie's in December. Its original Golden Fleece ornament can be seen today in the Treasury of the Residenz Palace in Munich , a blue glass replica of the Wittelsbach in place of where the diamond was set.

See Schlosshotel Kronberg. The treasures of the Kings of Saxony are kept in Dresden. Aside from those items already present in Vienna, the last Holy Roman Emperor, Francis II , brought there much of the Imperial regalia traditionally located elsewhere, before the final collapse of the Holy Roman Empire in Other objects associated with the coronation of Holy Roman Emperors can be found in Aachen , in the treasury of the Aachen Cathedral.

The cathedral also houses a stone throne associated with Charlemagne , and was a traditional site for certain of the Imperial coronation ceremonies.

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The Aachen City Hall houses copies of several important items of the Imperial regalia, now in Vienna, which had previously been kept in their city. Both the old city hall and the core of the cathedral were once parts of the palace of Charlemagne. A new crown design was created for the new German empire, and used extensively in heraldic and other national emblems; however the actual crown itself was never constructed, aside from models. Its use as a national emblem was discontinued after the collapse of the German monarchy in November ; examples of the design can still be found on various buildings and monuments from that era, including the Reichstag.

In practice, the crown jewels of the Kingdom of Prussia were used for the Emperors of Germany, with some new items being created. A set of crown jewels were created for the first modern Greek king, Otto of Greece , but he never wore them and took them with him after fleeing the country. His descendants later returned the regalia to Greece, but they were still never worn by any Greek monarch. Other remnants, or claimed remnants, of the regalia of the former Eastern Roman Empire, or items created in the Imperial workshops, can be found among the regalia of various European royal houses; having been dispersed at various times and in various ways.

Presumably, the bulk of the Imperial regalia found in Constantinople at the time of its conquest by the Ottoman Turks in , was absorbed into the treasury of the Turkish Sultan. Examples of ancient-classical Greek regalia have been found among royal burial-goods in tombs at various archaeological sites.

The most famous examples of which are probably certain of Heinrich Schleman's finds, artifacts of ancient Crete, and the burials of the Macedonian Dynasty. No king of Hungary was regarded as having been truly legitimate without being crowned with it. The Hungarian coronation insignia consists of the Holy Crown, the sceptre, the orb, and the mantle. Since the 12th century, kings have been crowned with the still extant crown.

The orb has the coat-of-arms of Charles I of Hungary — ; the other insignia can be linked to Saint Stephen. It was first called the Holy Crown in During the 14th century royal power came to be represented not simply by a crown, but by just one specific object: the Holy Crown. Older pre-conquest items relevant to the ancient Gaelic dynasties that once ruled Ireland probably also existed. One example of this is an ancient relic called the Comerford or "Ikerrin" Crown that was discovered in but may have since been lost.

The coronation robe is kept in the Schatzkammer in Vienna , Austria.


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The Crown jewels of the Kingdom of Italy are in the custody of the Bank of Italy , due to legal controversy between the Italian Republic and the Savoia family. It is not clear who is the legal owner.

Stealing the Crown Jewels

On being made Grand Duke of Tuscany Cosimo I de' Medici was granted the use of an open radial crown with a representation of the red Florentine fleurs-de-lis with its stamens posed between the petals in place of the ray in the front, completely covered with precious stones, by Pope Pius V , who specified that the circlet of this crown be engraved with an inscription that the crown had been granted him to wear by the Pope. On the actual crown this inscription was placed on the back of the circlet, while the front was actually covered with precious stones like the rest of the crown.

A sceptre consisting of a gilt rod topped with a red-enameled globe topped in turn by a red-enameled Florentine Lily also formed part of the regalia of the Grand Dukes of Tuscany. The coronation portrait of the Grand Duke Gian Gaston de' Medici shows the same Florentine grand ducal crown closed with the pearl set arches associated with sovereignty.

Economic Manuscripts: Capital Vol. I - Chapter Twenty-Seven

This crown was also used as the heraldic crown in the arms of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. Of the imperial regalia of the Roman Emperors, previous to the Byzantine era, little remains. The best-known examples, and those with the strongest claim to authenticity, are a sceptre, some fittings for Roman standards, and other small items, all from a cache buried on the Palatine Hill c.

The objects were made of fine bronze, glass, and semi-precious stone.

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These items were almost certainly intended for personal use by the emperor and his retinue, making them unique surviving examples of their type. The archaeologists who excavated the find have suggested that the items might have belonged to the emperor Maxentius , and may have been concealed by some unknown loyalist followers after his final defeat, and subsequent death. Beyond this, the regalia of the ancient Roman emperors exists primarily in artistic depictions from their time-period.

The crown jewels of the Kingdom of Man consist of a ceremonial sword known as the Manx Sword of State. The Sword of State is carried by the sword bearer before the Queens personal representative to the Isle of Man, the Lieutenant Governor, at each meeting of Tynwald day and dates from not later than the 12th century.

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It is popularly said to be the sword of Olaf the Black , who became King of Mann and the Isles in Recent analysis of the sword has determined that it is a 15th-century design, and probably made in London. The blade itself is thought to have been fitted in the late 16th or 17th century. It is possible that the sword was made for the Tynwald meeting that was attended by Sir John Stanley. Monaco features a heraldic crown on its coat-of-arms , but does not possess any crown jewels or regalia per se. The Crown Regalia, or crown jewels, of Norway are together with some other old treasures on permanent display in an exhibition at the Archbishop's Palace next to the Nidaros Cathedral , in Trondheim.

The only surviving part of the Polish Crown Jewels is from the Piast dynasty and consists of the coronation sword known as the Szczerbiec. Today it is displayed in the Royal Castle in Dresden, Germany. The Portuguese Crown Jewels were the pieces of jewelry, regalia, and vestments worn by the Monarchs of Portugal during the time of the Portuguese Monarchy. Over the nine centuries of Portuguese history , the Portuguese Crown Jewels have lost and gained many pieces. This gesture was symbolic because was the th anniversary of the First Serbian Uprising.

They were made in Paris by the famous Falise brothers jewellery company. A document known as "The Swabian Mirror" or Schwabenspiegel c. This crown was placed on the head of the duke during the enthronement ceremony. The crown or hat is described as "a grey Slovenian Hat with a grey cord and four leaves suspended from the brim".

In the Habsburg Duke Rudolf IV imparted coats of arms to those provinces without them and ordered the Slovenian Hat to be placed above the arms of the Slovenian March later called Lower Carniola and now a province of Slovenia. A crown called the "ducal hat" of Carniola still exists in Graz. The kingdoms that would consolidate to form Spain during the 15th and 16th centuries, namely the Kingdoms of Castile and Aragon, did not have consistent coronation ceremonies. The last recorded coronation ceremony in what would become Spain occurred in the 15th century; since then, the monarchs were not crowned, but proclaimed.

As such, there was decreased importance for a coherent set of crown jewels, as these are usually themselves coronation regalia. Much of what did exist into the modern era of the regalia of Spain was destroyed in the Great Fire of Madrid of Christmas Eve This crown is made of golden silver, and it features half-arches resting on 8 plates bearing the emblems of the Kingdom.

The crown and scepter are displayed during the opening of the Cortes Parliament. During ceremonies of accession with a new monarch, the crown and scepter are also present, but the crown itself is never placed on the monarch's head. Today they are kept by the Patrimonio Nacional the National Heritage.

Today, there are other pieces of jewelry and historically important items that would be considered "crown jewels" in other countries but are not denominated as such in Spain. In terms of jewelry, all of the jewels and tiaras worn by the members of the Spanish Royal Family are privately owned by them.

More historically important elements are kept as pieces of cultural interest in different parts of Spain.